The Québec maritime Blog

Côte-Nord

Côte-Nord is vast, wild and spectacular. Made up of the tourist regions of Manicouagan and Duplessis, it extends from Tadoussac to Blanc-Sablon and from the north shore of the St. Lawrence northward, to where the boreal forest gives way to the taiga. Out at sea and from the shore, up to 13 species of whales can be observed in this region. Côte-Nord is a land of extremes, from the Saguenay Fjord to the canyons of Anticosti Island, not to mention the mysterious monoliths of the Mingan Archipelago.

Various winter activities allow visitors to discover the vastness of this territory, whether by riding the region’s many snowmobile trails or exploring snowshoeing and cross-country skiing trails. Ice fishing, wildlife observation and dogsledding are also among the many activities offered to visitors wishing to explore this untamed wilderness area.

To plan your trip, check out our Côte-Nord section.

 

From Island to Island in the Maritime Regions of Québec

   |   By Marie-Ève Blanchard

It goes without saying that one of the main attractions of the maritime regions of Québec is the amazing coastlines you can admire as you drive along the majestic St. Lawrence. However, there are also about 2700 islands in the St. Lawrence that contribute to the distinctive character of these regions.

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Vacationing in Côte-Nord: A Stay at Auberge La Rosepierre

   |   By Tanya Paquet

As soon as I arrived, I was warmly welcomed by the owners, Thomas and Sabine Koller. They bought the inn two years ago and immigrated to Québec as a result. They make up the entire team at Auberge La Rosepierre, doing everything from checking in guests to cooking to housekeeping.

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Tadoussac: A Small Bay Among Giants

   |   By Le Québec maritime

Bruno Therrien has been a restaurant owner and municipal councillor in Tadoussac for nearly 25 years. A native of the area, he was born with "tadou," an affliction that can only be caught in Tadoussac and that causes someone to either never leave or eventually return. The main symptom is an unconditional love for Tadoussac, its bay and the fjord.

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