The Québec maritime Blog

Jean-Pascal Côté

A certified translator and avid outdoorsman, Jean-Pascal Côté works as a freelance writer and translator in Bas-Saint-Laurent, the region where he was born. He regularly escapes his daily life by going road biking, cycle touring or cyclocross racing, skiing in the mountains of Bas-Saint-Laurent or Western Canada, or sea kayaking on the St. Lawrence River. He is constantly dreaming up new travel plans. He also blogs (on an admittedly irregular basis) about his cycle touring adventures.

Winter Fun at the Ferme 5 Étoiles Holiday Resort

   |   By Jean-Pascal Côté

A true paradise is hidden some 15 minutes away from Tadoussac, in the Côte-Nord region. Nestled along the majestic Saguenay Fjord, the Ferme 5 Étoiles holiday resort combines a prime location with a range of diverse and original activities to make the most of winter in Québec.

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Wintertime at Domaine Valga

   |   By Jean-Pascal Côté

Located in the highland of Bas-Saint-Laurent, right in the middle of the idyllic forest and mountain, Domaine Valga has all the ingredients for great wintertime vacations: a perfect environment for winter activities, cozy lodging and high-quality cuisine served in a relaxed atmosphere.

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Backcountry Skiing and Snowboarding in the Chic-Chocs

   |   By Jean-Pascal Côté

Do you love the grandeur of winter landscapes? Are you looking for a feeling of total freedom? Are you craving the adrenaline rush that comes with mountain activities? Then, backcountry skiing is made for you. And the Chic-Choc Mountains, in the Gaspésie region in Eastern Canada, are a true paradise for this.

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Step Back in Time at an Authentic Former General Store

   |   By Jean-Pascal Côté

I must say I was very impressed by my visit to the Magasin Général Historique Authentique 1928, located in Percé, right at the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula. It’s a former general store of the Robin, Jones and Whitman Company, whose last owner was Gaston Cloutier. Just before passing away in 2000, Mr. Cloutier handed the store over to his sons, Rémi and Ghislain, who decided to turn it into a living museum.

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